Sunday, March 23, 2014

... not a secular burden but a religious duty.

Torah Study And The Defense Of Israel

By: Rabbi Jeremy Gimpel in the Jewish Press
Published: March 20th, 2014
Latest update: March 21st, 2014

I am a platoon sergeant in the IDF. I am a religious Jew. I am a platoon sergeant in the IDF because I am a religious Jew.

Recently, hundreds of thousands of haredim gathered in Jerusalem to protest the idea that they should be drafted into the army like every other Jewish citizen of Israel. This, they claim, is the Torah law and the will of God.

It is nearly impossible to find a precedent in all of Tanach, Talmud or Jewish history where Jews did not go out to defend their country together. There is not one time when Jews were exempt from fighting alongside their brothers because they were learning Torah.

Joshua, the spiritual leader and commander of the first Jewish army in the land of Israel, was commanded by God that “the Torah shall not depart from your mouth day and night.” In the haredi paradigm, we should expect to read about the houses of study Joshua established. Instead, for the next seven years Joshua went out to battle with all his people.

Ironically, that passage in the first chapter in the book of Joshua is the primary textual source for the commandment to learn Torah.

King David, the author of so many of our treasured prayers, also went out to battle. With a Torah scroll by his side he led his men in war and toward peace. The Maccabees were priests in the Holy Temple. Matityahu was the high priest and his son Judah a priest as well. Both led the military revolt against the Greek empire. Later, Rabbi Akiva led his students to war under Bar Kochba against the Roman occupation in Israel.

For those who can’t find value in the Jewish state and therefore refuse to defend it (or to even thank God for its existence on Yom Ha’atzmaut), a religious re-education is in order. There has never been more Torah study in the land of Israel in all our history than there is today. More synagogues, mikvehs, yeshivas and seminaries have been built by the modern state of Israel than ever before. In quantifiable numbers, the amount of people learning Torah in our modern state dwarfs anything that King David, King Solomon, Ezra, Nehemiah, the Hasmoneans and Rabbi Akiva ever produced.

Outside of Israel, the greatest yeshivas like Volozhin and Lublin had no more than 300 students. Even the legendary institutions of Sura and Pumpedita had approximately 1,000 students. Just the fact that there are hundreds of thousands of Torah students in Israel to protest is reason enough to celebrate the country.

Only the modern state of Israel with a trained military could have transformed our shattered and devastated people after the Holocaust into a new spiritual empire. While it is forbidden to rely on miracles, we live as a free people again today because of our brave, dedicated soldiers. Only a few decades ago Jews wore a different kind of uniform – one with stripes and a yellow star.

In this sense, the popular demand “to share the burden” creates the wrong discourse and misses the heart of what it means to be a Jew in our country. Serving in the first unified Jewish army in the Land of Israel since the times of King David is not a burden; it is a privilege, an honor, and a miracle. It is unconscionable for a religious Jew living in the Promised Land, connected to his heritage and his history, not to want to serve in the army.

Although the ultimate Jewish vision aspires to no army, no soldiers and no weapons of war, the story of the modern Jewish army is the next chapter in the ongoing saga of Jewish history.

Israel Eldad articulates this point in his book The Jewish Revolution. “Some time in 1953,” he writes, “a remarkable series of ancient letters was discovered in the Judean desert. These were the letter of the last commander of Judea, Simon Bar Kochba, the leader of the last great revolt against the Romans…. The letters, addressed to commanders in various theaters of operation, were personally signed by him. Now they are on display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

“This by itself is an outstanding archeological discovery. But it is not the most miraculous part of the story. The true miracle lies in the fact that the person who discovered the letters of the last Jewish commander was the well-known archeologist, General Yigael Yadin, effectively the first commander of the new Jewish army.

“For 1,820 years Bar Kochba’s letters lay hidden in the Judean desert, in clay pots where they were preserved for some unknown date in the future.… They were waiting until they reached their final destination. The letters of Bar Kochba, the last commander of the Jewish army, thus reached the first commander of the new Jewish army after 1,820 years as if by personal delivery….”

What Eldad does not discuss is what Bar Kochba wrote and how relevant his message is today. He ordered his men to deliver lulavs and etrogs to his soldiers in the battlefield. It was the holiday of Sukkot and his Torah-observant troops wanted to serve God while they served in His army.

A call to us from the days of Rabbi Akiva to never forget that serving in the Jewish army is not a secular burden but a religious duty.

5 Comments:

At March 26, 2014 at 9:50 AM , Anonymous Wolofsky said...

They don't need the extra soldiers... They addmit this ... They only need haradim to make them hilonim...

 
At March 26, 2014 at 9:51 AM , Anonymous Wolofsky said...

They don't need the extra soldiers... They addmit this ... They only need haradim to make them hilonim...

 
At April 1, 2014 at 1:02 AM , Anonymous Les said...

Funny that the nahal soldiers have not become hilonim.

Let the bocherim do national service, just stop sucking the life out of Israel by refusing to contribute to the state they deny legitimacy to while gleefully taking benefits from.

THAT IS THE CHILLUL HASHEM.

 
At May 13, 2014 at 5:26 AM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

If only it were Joshuah's army, Jeremy.

I went for 1 day's training for civilian volunteers at a Ma"gav base. At the meat lunch break, I had a fork that had engraved on it "Chalavi" (Milk). When quietly informed, they said that it happened all the time because soldiers take food and utensils to their barracks; thus, these things get all mixed up. On the other hand, they said the heat of the dish-washing water kashers them anew, so it doesn't matter.
Could a Torah observant Jew eat there? I couldn't bring myself to.

As a new Oleh, my patriotic son (a US Navy nuclear submarine vet) and other young men of his yeshivah were recruted for pre-induction IDF training. They were given a female combat instructor. Rolling. Touching. They didn't know what to do to preserve her and their modesty.

These are just personal experiences. Not mentioning glass-ceilings for Torahni officers to reach high command IDF positions. Nor closing off/ decreasing Nachal Chareidi units.
Nor punishing religious soldiers for not participating in anti-religious free-time events.

What is the agenda of the IDF and politicians in regards to religious Jewry? If only it were to create an army like Joshua's!!!

 
At May 20, 2014 at 5:16 PM , Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am all for defending your country
however, there are some cowardly torah observent pure souls who need to find work in any capacity. This is a situation unique to Israel. Perhaps they can find a suitable national service for them in non-combat positions. The brave among the haredim should still contribute and explain the need for kosher standards. They also need to understand, in life or death situations, the sabbath can be broken. Sometimes, common sense is missing amongst this group.

 

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