09 May 2012

Remarkable Discovery

It seems Israeli archaelogists have been unearthing more and more artifacts that substantiate our presence in our Land from Biblical times. Many Jews need no substantiation, but revel in the items relating to our ancestors nevertheless. I feel that the unearthing of Biblical artifacts sends messages of encouragement for the Israeli Government to do "the Right Thing" vis a vis G-d's command to enter our Land and our Return to our Homeland.

As the Geula is approaching, these 'finds' are encouragement to many, and should soon put to rest the Palestinian lies. To Jews living in other lands this can only stir the emotions, hopefully, and perhaps provide the impetus to return Home. The following was first seen on VosizNeas, but printed here in part from The Jerusalem Post:

Discovery of 3 Small Shrines Have Revealed Use of Ancient Architectural Consistent with Solomon's Temple



A Hebrew University archeologist has discovered artifacts from a 3,000-year-old community that have created a new understandings of how the First Temple was built, the university announced on Tuesday.

Prof. Yosef Garfinkel, the Yigal Yadin Professor of Archeology at the university, displayed models of items excavated in Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city in the Valley of Elah, about 30 km. southwest of Jerusalem.

The religious community, which Garfinkel believes was Jewish, based on the lack of pig bones and graven images, kept small shrines in rooms of three buildings. The small ritual objects are box-like in shape and made from basalt or clay. The shrines predate the First Temple by at least 30 years, but utilize important architectural designs written in the Torah that describe how the Temple should be built.

The discovery of these ritual objects has allowed archeologists a new understanding of the Temple’s construction, explained Garfinkel.

More than 20 architectural terms that describe the Temple no longer exist in modern language, so models of the Temple are based on educated guesses. For example, the Torah states that the Temple had “slaot,” which was previously understood as “columns,” and “sequfim,” which was widely translated as “windows.” But after studying the small shrines, Garfinkel concluded that the number of slaot corresponded to triglyphs, ornamental decorations above the columns, and the number of sequifim was consistent with a triple recessed doorway, rather than windows.[...]


[Please go to JPost link above for remainder of article.]

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